Apps, Maps & Models: A Symposium on Digital Pedagogy and Research in Art History, Archaeology and Visual Studies

Apps, Maps & Models: A Symposium on Digital Pedagogy and Research in Art History, Archaeology and Visual Studies

On Monday, February 22, 2016 over 160 art historians and curators, librarians and image specialists, scientists, teachers, and administrators attended Apps, Maps & Models: A Symposium on Digital Pedagogy and Research in Art History, Archaeology and Visual Studies, sponsored by the Wired! Lab of the Dept. of Art, Art History & Visual Studies and hosted by the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University.


Caroline Bruzelius, Duke University


Sarah Schroth, Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University


Richard Powell, Duke University

The symposium was co-organized by Caroline Bruzelius, Anne M. Cogan Professor of Art History, and John Taormina, director of the Visual Media Center. Introductory remarks were provided by Bruzelius: Sarah W. Schroth, Mary D.B.T. and James H. Semans Director, Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University; and Richard J. Powell, John Spencer Bassett Professor of Art and Art History and Dean of Humanities, Duke University. Taormina and Bruzelius moderated the two morning sessions; Sheila Dillon, professor of art history and classical studies and chair of Art, Art History & Visual Studies, moderated the two afternoon sessions.


John Taormina, Duke University


Sheila Dillon, Duke University

Attendees hailed from over fifty institutions in twenty states in the U.S., as well as from universities in England, France, and Italy. The registrants and speakers represented colleges and universities, libraries and museums, government cultural agencies, county school districts, and the private sector.

At the end of the day and during the reception in the Nasher’s atrium, attendees could also wander through the museum’s galleries as well as view the The Lives of Things Digital Exhibition: Project Polychromy, which was introduced by Mark Olson, Cordelia and William Laverack Family Assistant Professor of Art, Art History & Visual Studies, and Mariano Tepper, post-doctoral associate, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University.


Mariano Tepper and Mark Olson, Duke University


The Lives of Things Digital Exhibition: Project Polychromy

The symposium was live streamed and over 375 connections were recorded from the U.S. and over fifteen countries (Germany, United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Israel, Australia, Italy, Spain, India, Norway, the Netherlands, France, the Russian Federations, Egypt, Lebanon, Norway, New Zealand, and Hungary).

Twitter was buzzing all day (#dah2016) and comments ranged from “Stop what you’re doing & watch the live stream of this fantastic symposium on digi. art history pedagogy” to “I’ve been looking forward to this digital humanities program for months!” to “Thank you for a great day of presentations & discussions & live streaming it all. Waving from Dublin!” Throughout the day tweets on specific presentations provided a running commentary on content as well as insightful observations from the tweeters. At one point a tweeter noted that the symposium was trending at 36 in the U.S.

One faculty attendee from another university stated: “Though it might smack of hyperbole, I want you to know that I found the symposium truly inspiring. The presentations, from first to last, were well-prepared and compelling, and the event run so smoothly and professionally that I don’t think I’ve attended a more professional panel.”

Symposium Program

Session 1
Moderator: John Taormina, Duke University


Speaker Dorothy Wong, University of Virginia

Pamela Fletcher, Bowdoin College
“Digital Art History: Where Do We Come From? What Are We?
Where Are We Going?”
Paul B. Jaskot, DePaul University
“Historical Journals as Digital Sources: Mapping Architecture in
Germany, 1914-24”
Dorothy Wong, University of Virginia
“Power of Compassion: Paths of Transmission of Avalokiteśvara
Across Asia”

Session 2
Moderator: Caroline Bruzelius, Duke University


Speaker Michael Davis, Mt. Holyoke College

Philip Stinson, University of Kansas
“Fieldnotes: Documenting Roman Architecture and Sculpture at
Aphrodisias and Sardis Using the New Photogrammetry”
Michael T. Davis, Mt. Holyoke College
“Evidence and Invention: Reconstructing the Franciscan Convent
and the College of Navarre in Paris”
Donal Cooper, University of Cambridge
“Modeling Architecture and Uncertainty in Renaissance Florence:
The Digital Reconstructions of Santa Chiara and San Pier Maggiore”

Session 3
Moderator: Sheila Dillon, Duke University


Speaker Fabrizio Nevola, University of Exeter

Suzanne Preston Blier, Harvard University
“Digging Out: Uncovering Urban Architectural Histories in West
Africa: A Comparative GIS Approach”
Fabrizio Nevola, University of Exeter
“The Italian Renaissance Piazza as Social Media Space”

Session 4
Moderator: Sheila Dillon, Duke University


Speaker Ingrid Daubechies, Duke University

Ingrid Daubechies, Duke University
“Mathematicians Helping Art Historians and Art Conservators”
C. Griffith Mann, Metropolitan Museum of Art
“Museums in a Digital World: Engaging Audiences in the
Collection”

The symposium was generously supported by the Duke University Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Office of the Dean of Humanities, Office of the Vice Provost for the Arts, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies, and the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University.


Symposium speakers during the discussion session.